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EYES ON THE NIGHT SKY: MAY 2018

Starry skies in the Claerwen Valley

 

Welcome to May’s edition of Eyes on the Night Sky. As we are nearly halfway through the year, the nights become brighter due to the approaching Summer Solstice in June. This month, we will make the most of those dark skies for viewing faint fuzzies for those few hours of night up around the middle of May/early June, where skies won’t get truly dark. However, there are still plenty of interesting objects to be studied, such as Lunar features, planets, open star clusters and double stars and more.

EYES ON THE NIGHT SKY: APRIL 2018

Welcome to the April edition of Eyes on the Night Sky. Springtime nights can provide a rich banquet of celestial delights before the nights get too light to enjoy the dark skies of the Elan Valley. Typically, April nights can be wonderfully clear and not too cold!

Elan Links scheme begins

A five-year £3.3 million investment for the Elan Valley has launched which aims to secure Elan Valley’s natural and cultural heritage and increase benefits and opportunities for locals and visitors.

EYES ON THE NIGHT SKY: MARCH 2018

Zodiacal Light

Welcome to this month’s edition of Eyes on the Night Sky. March is a busy month with two full moons, a couple of star clusters to study and an opportunity to see three planets in one morning! In addition, there is a rare and beautiful phenomenon to watch out for this month if you have access to dark sites such as the light pollution-free skies of the Elan Valley. Click here to find out more.

EYES ON THE NIGHT SKY: FEBRUARY 2018

Earthshine, by Steve Richards

Welcome to February’s edition of Eyes on the Night Sky. This month, there are still plenty of early, dark evenings to view your favourite objects, even though the nights are starting to draw out.

The New Moon occurs on 15th February and around that time, watch out for earthshine before dusk on 19th February, which is where the rest of the Moon’s surface can be seen, illuminated by the Earth’s light. It is also more poetically known as the “ashen glow” or, “the old Moon in the new Moon’s arms” and is very lovely to look at. If you were standing on the Moon looking at the Earth, you would see that the Earth is fully illuminated by the Sun which causes this effect. This can be seen any time in the year around the time of a New Moon at twilight. There is no Full Moon in February, as the previous one was on 31st January, which is commonly known as a Blue Moon month, a second full moon in a calendar month. In fact, there will be a second Blue Moon month in March, where another two Full Moons occur on 2nd and 31st March! Click here for the full article.

Penbont House Tearoom and B&B

UPDATE: 8th January 2018. Elan Valley Trust have finally secured planning permission to extend and renovate Penbont House subject to planning conditions. We are in the process of discharging these conditions and hope to commence highways improvements once the relevant permissions have been given. Subject to these permissions it is proposed that building works commence Spring 2018. It is not anticipated that Penbont will be open until at least Mid to late Summer 2018. 

EYES ON THE NIGHT SKY: JANUARY 2018

The night sky in January 2018

A Happy New Year to all stargazers! We hope you had a great Christmas and that you are keen to try out your new telescope or binoculars! Even though the Christmas rush is over, there is still plenty going in the night sky, with a great planetary conjunction, two full Moons and deep space objects to study.

EYES ON THE NIGHT SKY: DECEMBER 2017

The night sky in the Northern Hemisphere for December 2017

December is a fabulous month for star clusters, nebulae and meteor showers. It is also the darkest part of the year as the Winter Solstice falls on 21st December, where the Sun is at its most southerly declination (it is one of two angles which indicates a position on the celestial sphere). It also means the North Pole is tilted at the furthest point away from the Sun. The Full Moon falls on 3rd December and New Moon on 18th December.

Tudalennau

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